Tag Archives: Book of Scripts

Postcard #6: A BOOK OF SCRIPTS

Postcard #6 reviews one of those subjects that we all feel an affinity with (I’d wager at least half of you have a favourite typeface – mine’s Baskerville, dahlings) without really having the faintest idea about it all. It’s a fact that probably becomes clear pretty quickly when you’re coerced into reading a bloody great tome dedicated to its history, structure and form. That’s not to say it’s not fascinating though, and our reviewer does a great job of showing us how complex and visual this art is – so much more complex than I suspect many of us give it credit for.

As an aside, I always find it difficult to consider the particulars of typography without thinking of the Guardian’s quite spectacular April Fool’s hoax of 1977, in which they created an entirely fictional island nation, Sans Seriffe (an archipelago comprising two islands, Upper Caisse and Lower Caisse), complete with a government (General Pica), harbour (Port Baskerville) and national bird (the kwote). Holiday companies were, for weeks thereafter, inundated with requests for Sans Seriffe travel brochures. Tremendous.

So, without further ado: A Book of Scripts.

Does exactly what it says on the tin

Two interesting facts about the designer of this cover. 1. He was denounced by the Nazi party as a 'cultural Bolshevist' in 1933. 2. He invented the typeface family Sabon. FACT.

Reverting to type

A brief history of calligraphy from the Romans to the Sixties that encapsulates just how much typography and design have changed! I’m not a graphic designer, but I enjoyed the insight into the process of crafting new styles. Half the book consists of facsimiles, which are interesting to flick through but fall a bit flat when grouped together without analysis. It’s a neat little read for graphics geeks though! Lisa Thom, 08/04/2012 lisathom.co.uk


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